CAMERA FLASH FROM THE RECENT PAST

Simplistic, clean & organized, highly stylized, geometrical, easy to interpret, visually pleasing and generally inoffensive; these are some of the words I’d like to describe my overall body of work. This series titled “Camera Flash from the Recent Past” is inspired by David Plowden’s lifetime works in the American heartland, photographing trains, grain elevators, and small towns. I felt a strong connection to the photographs that had a timeless appearance, compositions that had no easily identifiable objects that could be linked to a specific time period, such as cars or signs with dates on them.

I’ve attempted to capture that same feeling in my photographs, where the photograph may have been captured at any point within a 50 year period. David Plowden felt that these types of landscapes and cityscapes were quickly disappearing in his time. Ironically enough, most rural towns through the great plains still look nearly the same 50 years later. These towns possess a certain peaceful charm that I enjoy and want to share.

I originally envisioned this series as black & white, just like David Plowden’s work. However I quickly realized that the story I wanted to tell would be incomplete and fairly uninteresting in black & white. Modern day color with digital SLR cameras was also fairly uninteresting and uninspiring to me. Through some experimentation, I discovered that a type of experimental color and sharpness, emulating the quality of film from the 1950s helped to tell a story I enjoyed more.

My first major body of photographs has focused on the towns of Greenville and Grapevine, TX. Greenville is a town that almost feels unintentionally frozen in the 1950s, and has provided a great contribution to my photographic collection. Grapevine appears to be very aware of its heritage and seems to embrace its older roots. As I continue to work on this project, I’ll likely discover other rural towns that have a similar timeless or time locked quality to Greenville and Grapevine.

My end goal for this series is to have works of art I can print and frame for display in my own home, to help inspire and provide a clean & organized, simplistic, highly stylized, geometrical, easy to interpret, visually pleasing and generally inoffensive living room for me and my guests to enjoy. I hope to eventually discover some alternative printing and framing techniques to display these works on as well.